Boomer Health & the XY Factor! Over the past 15 years, Gen X and Gen Y have been exposed to more get-healthy-quick programs than their Baby Boomer parents were as 20-somethings/30-somethings. It is instilled that boot-camp training (remember Tae Bo?), natural cures, organic diets and holistic medicines will provide that overnight health-improvement sensation.

With more Boomers becoming empty-nesters, they want to experience 65 as the new 40 in their own lives. This includes looking good on the outside and feeling good in the inside. Their now 20-/30-something children can offer some good tips and are a credible source of information!

http://www.chicagotribune.com/sns-health-60-new-40,0,4560645.story?page=2

Here’s why

TV shows – Gens X and Y have grown up with cable news channels (CNN Heath, On-Demand Health, Food Network (no, not Paula Deen or Man vs. Food, but series like 5 Simple Ingredients). Aside from cable, TV prime-time has shifted focus to series such as Amazing Race and Biggest Loser. These shows are a far cry from the game shows and science-fiction series of the 1960s and ’70s that Boomers were exposed to.

News content online – News sites have health stories and tips on their homepage that take viewers to health sub-channels and can visit Web MD. Boomers did not have this convenience when they were in their 20s and 30s.

Organic groceries and items – Whole Foods and greenwise-like grocers have exploded. They are a far cry from the standard grocery or drug stores that Boomers patronized as 20-/30-somethings.

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/6638417/

Smart phones and tablets – Engagements in health-related content and quizzes: Back in the ’60s and ’ 70s, the only finger-touching devices were typewriters and eight-track tapes.

http://blogs.redorbit.com/health-apps-increase-in-popularity-despite-fda-difficulties/

Social media – Nowadays, members of Generations X and Y like their favorite fitness magazines and gyms on Facebook and are always opening their living social e-mails to see whether there are deals for fitness clubs, group exercise or yoga.

With all this knowledge, Gens X and Y can now educate their parents on these trends. So the next time businesses are developing smart-phone apps geared toward the under-40 crowd, remember to add a component and tie it in to helping Mom and Dad.

The next time a health-food or fitness ad campaign is geared toward recruiting Boomers for a call to action, remember to mention that their children are probably taking advantage of it, too. Boomers will ask their children for info and will receive a mini-education.

written by: John DiCostanzo